Posted on

Taking Pot Shots At Yockey

Francis Parker Yockey stands in the bull’s eye in this review of Kevin Coogan’s book DREAMER OF THE DAY. This work is subtitled FRANCIS PARKER YOCKEY AND THE POSTWAR FASCIST INTERNATIONAL. Coogan, a bit of a left-anarchist, is remarkably fair in his treatment of Yockey even though they are poles apart politically. The same can’t said of Martin Lee’s THE BEAST REAWAKENS, written about the same time, dealing with many of the same people & events.

This review in the blog BLACK STAR REVIEW by one ‘Pan’ is also meant to be hostile towards Yockey after the afore-mentioned Martin Lee. However, this ‘Pan’ character does a good summary of what made Francis Parker Yockey unique & different. Only 10% is crap which is a reversal of Sturgeon’s Law.

So, we’re re-printing the review in full. You, dear reader, can judge for yourself.

The first and most obvious question to ask of this book is: why would anybody be at all interested in Francis Parker Yockey? He was an obscure fascist ideologue, author of books that were little read and less understood, paranoid and secretive and almost permanently on the run. When he committed suicide, shortly after his capture by the FBI in 1960, he was hardly known even within the far-right. So, why should anyone be interested?

What made Yockey different to many of his comrades in the far-Right was his insistence that the United States was the ultimate enemy. Where many on the Right, particularly in the States and in Europe, saw Russia and Communism as the focus of their hatred, Yockey saw America and American capitalism as the primary threat. Of course this wasn’t an entirely original point view-point, the ‘National Bolshevik’ wing of fascism has existed for as long as fascism has existed as a distinct ideology. There were those who always saw through the Soviet rhetoric and recognized the affinities between National Socialism and State Socialism. Indeed, straight after the war the Russians were pumping money to German neo-Nazis who had adopted an anti-American line (see THE BEAST REAWAKENS by Martin Lee). However, this trend had little influence in the States, where a more traditional far-Right existed.

Kevin Coogan’s book describes what is known of Yockey’s life, though it has to be said that trying to piece together a life that was lived in shadow is no easy task. While much is known about Yockey’s earlier life, once he became fully engaged with his ‘underground’ existence things tend to get hazy. However, Coogan skillfully weaves the story, and there are enough diversions along the way to keep the book interesting.

Yockey’s life and work sheds light on the post-war fascist scene, and in particular some of the individuals involved in this nebulous world of shifting alliances and factional back-biting. In some of the more interesting sections of the book, Coogan uncovers some of Yockey’s links to the Eastern Bloc and to various ‘leftist’ individuals. That he was involved with Palestinians and anti-Zionists, for example, is to be expected. That he seemed to be involved with supporting Castro and the Cuban government is a little more surprising.

Why is Yockey interesting? Because his legacy lives on and has taken root in a big way. His style of fascism tries to blur the distinctions between ‘left’ and ‘right’. His style of fascism is as likely to support Third World nationalism, black racial separatists, animal liberation and working class rights. His style of fascism is ready to work with people on the ‘left’, and indeed are actively attempting to pass themselves off as left-wing revolutionaries. Taking a look at a ‘National Anarchist’ or ‘National Bolshevik’ web site is a disorienting experience. That’s why Yockey is interesting.

Advertisements

About mauryk2

Vietnam veteran. Succeeded Jeff Sharlett as editor of VIETNAM GI, 1st anti-war paper put out by Nam vets. Edited RAP!, underground paper at Ft Benning. Until retirement from Postal Service, put out the POSTAL HARDHITTER, another underground newsletter. Presently, I'm a free lance writer.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s